Saturday, December 22, 2012

Village in Manila City Bears The Mark Of The Beast

I didn't know there's a Barangay (Village) in Metro Manila that bears the number 666 as its official name. As the news below says, that its the only barangay in the Philippines which has the mark of the beast.

By the way, this isn't an urban legend. I just wanted to share this news I found in internet.



The News



[Taken from a News Website: October 31, 2012, 10:10pm]

Almost a month ago, a 21-year-old man committed suicide by hanging from a balete tree located in a compound where the Barangay 666 Hall is located.

Stories recounted by witnesses revealed that prior to the man’s suicide, the man named “Angelito” used to talk every night to someone unseen, who allegedly lives underneath the small fig tree.

But in an interview with MB Research, “Diablo” just dismissed such stories as fictional, citing that “Angelito” had earlier been diagnosed with a mental disorder, which probably led to his self-murder. “Diablo” also doesn’t believe in ghost stories, even if his village has long been synonymous with the mark of the devil.

“Diablo” is Felix “Mac” P. Macapagal, the incumbent chairman of Barangay 666, Zone 72 in Ermita, Manila. Macapagal has been fondly tagged “Mac Diablo” because he has long been serving as head of Barangay 666 since he was first elected in 1989.

He has lived in this residential community since the 1970s, during his growing-up years, and in his recollection, he has never experienced any frightening incidents in his bailiwick.

The number 666 is specifically mentioned in the Holy Bible’s Book of Revelation as the mark of the beast. Chapter 13:18 of Revelation quotes: “a certain wisdom is needed here; with a little ingenuity, anyone can calculate the number of the beast, for it is a number that stands for a certain man. The man’s number is six hundred sixty-six.”

“It forced all men, small and great, rich and poor, slave and free, to accept a stamped image on their right hand or their forehead. Moreover, it did not allow a man to buy or sell anything unless he was first marked with the name of the beast or with the number that stood for its name,” Revelation 13:16-17 further states.

Macapagal said that there is nothing special or extraordinary with their barangay, aside from coincidentally having the beast’s mark. He emphatically clarified that no beast has ever existed in their area.

“We are not like the other cities that have names for their barangay. In Manila, number is the basis for every barangay. It’s just a coincidence that our barangay is 666,” said Macapagal. He noted that Ermita has four other barangays aside from 666, which are 667, 668, 669 and 670.

Out of around 42,000 barangays in the Philippines, National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) official Fernando Regalado certified that it is the only village in the country that bears the name 666.

Officer Arlene Ramos of the Department of Interior and Local Government-National Barangay Operations Office (DILG-NBOO) affirmed that even if the National Capital Region (NCR) still has cities with numbers as name, it is only Manila that has the unique Barangay 666.

“Our barangay is 666, many are scared, but we don’t believe in it because we don’t feel that 666 is unlucky. Actually, it seems lucky because we never get sick and my body is doing good,” said Macapagal.

Located at the heart of Manila, the nation’s capital, Barangay 666 covers a large land area, where an estimated 1,400 people live in houses and condominiums. The compound, where their barangay hall stands is a 10-minute walking distance from the Manila City Hall. It also houses a small school for the children.

Interestingly, Barangay 666’s jurisdiction includes famous landmarks in Manila like the Rizal Park, Qurino Grandstand, United Nations Avenue, Padre Burgos Street, Manila Ocean Park, and even the United States embassy.

“What we’re talking about are the primary duties of the barangay, which is what we are doing. Like the business permit clearance, there has to be a barangay chairman who will give it. So even if it’s a national park, which is under the National Parks Development Committee (NPDC), there is still a barangay that manages it,” said Macapagal.

NPDC Marketing and Events Specialist Florizza Buclatin confirmed in a separate interview Macapagal’s statements that as for the coverage of the entire Rizal Park, Barangay 666 starts from Taft Avenue, to the Relief Map of the Philippines, leading to all the parks, gardens and other attractions, to the famed ‘Kilometer Zero’ and execution site of Jose Rizal, up to Quirino Grandstand and Manila Ocean Park.

Barangay 666 also covers various government offices in the vicinity, like NPDC, the Department of Tourism (DOT), the National Historical Commission of the Philippines (NHCP), the National Library and the National Museum.

Macapagal and Buclatin clarified, though, that management of barangay officials only comes in terms of small issues and affairs, like minor feuds among people within the area that need to be settled first at the barangay level.

“If there are barangay matters that they can’t handle, it will be brought to us, like disputes of the guards, which should be taken care first by the barangay [officials],” said Macapagal.

But ghost stories in the area and offices covered by Barangay 666 remain to take the spotlight in the village.

Buclatin said that although she hasn’t experienced anything unusual yet, stories, like toilets suddenly flushing without someone using it, seem to take over most of their scary conversations inside their workplace.

Allan Mangahas, janitor of the National Library, in another interview, seconded Buclatin’s claims that many students had told her about eerie tales like seeing ghosts inside the reading room and comfort rooms of the library.

Mangahas added that sometimes, he is afraid when left alone at the ground floor, but he clarified that “it still depends on the people’s strong faith, because [even if I’m scared,] I haven’t experienced anything.”

However, Macapagal insisted that such stories are only for kids and should not be considered anymore by adults. He added that ghost stories were used back then just to convince the young ones to sleep early at night.

Divina Villacarlos, lady guard of the National Museum, also believed that there are no ghosts, since she hasn’t experienced yet such supernatural beings. She said that as a security guard, she has been assigned to different floors of the museums, but she has never seen anything scary.

Macapagal revealed there are other things that seem scarier than ghosts or beasts in the barangay.

“Those live ones are whom we have to be afraid of, since dead people can no longer come back,” said Macapagal, as he noted the increasing number of snatchers, holduppers, and riding-in-tandem gangs in the metropolis. He also mentioned the problems of increasing street children in his barangay, especially now with the onset of the holiday season.

With proper coordination of the police force and social workers, Macapagal said they can continuously cope with the different issues in their community.

Macapagal also boasted one ‘special’ landmark in their barangay, aside from the usual markers found at the Rizal Park.

“We have the Luneta Hotel, a century-old hotel, which is being renovated. It is perhaps the only building in the Philippines which has a unique structure fixed at the exterior walls of the building,” he said pointing at the winged lizard and monkey-like structures built as part of the hotel’s designs.

According to the chairman’s research, a Spanish architect-engineer had built the hotel, which is now being preserved by the government.

“We think that there is someone protecting the building. Nobody has ever been hurt every time an accident occurs in the area, specifically when the designs are damaged or suddenly falls. That’s why we think Luneta Hotel is unique,” said Macapagal.

Meanwhile, Macapagal no longer aims to change the name of his barangay.

“Our barangay is happy, even if it is 666. It will be tedious to have it changed because it will have to undergo Congress. Since it is destined to become our [barangay] number, we have already accepted it [though] we are not devils,” Macapagal said.


Sources:
http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/379526/manila-barangay-bears-the-mark-of-the-beast#.UNNBaJGxNk4

You may also visit:


Mt. Cristobal: Devil's Mountain
Bloody Mary in the Philippines
666 in Cabanatuan
Tide is the Devil's Detergent

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

The Kleptomaniac

Actually, I don't know if I should include this in my blog, because this can be just a gossip or some what a joke. Well urban legends came also from these sources and the public just took it very serious.

There's this intriguing blind item in showbiz (show business) in the Philippines by a tabloid news paper. The said news paper didn't mention the name of the celebrity suspected of being a kleptomaniac.





The Blind Item



[Taken from a Showbiz News Website:]

"There is a fly in the ointment in what is generally perceived to be wedded bliss of a very popular showbiz couple. The husband found out that her [sic] angelic wife, a scion of an old haciendero family, suffers from kleptomania. It was only recently that he was shocked to learn, after being told by an executive of a ritzy Makati department store, that his wife was caught shoplifting.

"The guy immediately proceeded to the store, paid double the amount involved (which were for small items really) and asked the management to clamp down on the incident. But the incident was repeated several times. The embarrassed husband hired a security guard to look after the wife. The guard was instructed to watch discreetly but closely if the wife shoplifts and pay for the item without creating a fuss.

"The husband has confronted the wife about this malady and the wife had agreed to undergo psychotherapy in St. Luke’s Hospital in Quezon City. The latest word is the wife is now seeing a shrink regularly.”


It turned out that the alarming blind item is talking about the angelic lady Ms. Lucy Torres-Gomez, and his husband Mr. Richard Gomez.



What is a Kleptomaniac?



Before we go on to our story, let's start by explaining what kleptomaniac actually is.

Kleptomania is the inability to refrain from the urge to steal items for reasons other than personal use or financial gain. First described in 1816, kleptomania is presently classified in psychiatry as an impulse control disorder. Alternatively, some of the main characteristics of the disorder, which consist of recurring intrusion feelings, an inability to resist the urge to steal, and a release of pressure following the theft, suggest that kleptomania could be an obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder, although this is disputed.

Actually, kleptomaniac person doesn't steal large items just like those of real thieves. Instead, they only steal fancy thing, or should I say cute things. The adventurous feeling of getting something from others is the satisfying thing they often wanted to feel.



Investigations and Conclusions



The media and other simple individual person took the conclusions about the names of the celebrities in the blind item. They took it seriously.

Showbiz TV Shows in every network made investigations and conclusions to defunct the rumor. Some of them claimed that the blind item is true, but some told it isn't.

[Taken from a Showbiz News Website:]

ABS-CBN PICKS UP. The “Lucy Torres-Gomez shoplifting incident” grew even louder when shows and people from the TV network ABS-CBN picked up the rumor.

The now-defunct showbiz-oriented ABS-CBN show Ek! Channel began running a story about the rumor in January 2005, complete with reenactment.

ABS-CBN newscasters Ces Drillon and Karen Davila also touched on the rumor. Ces did her own investigating and began asking around, while Karen was supposed to be keeping the “surveillance tape” of the whole “shoplifting and arresting” scene that happened in the “ritzy Makati department store” mentioned in the blind item. This establishment was also identified as Rustan’s Department Store.

The Buzz was also getting ready to launch its own take on the rumor, as it grew even louder in cyberspace through web forum discussions and emails, complete with the “conversation” between Lucy and the guards who “caught” her “shoplifting.”

And in the emails and forums, the rumor began to sound believable since the pinpointed sources of the story were “people from ABS-CBN.”

For almost a year, nothing was heard from the subject of the shoplifting rumor. Lucy kept quiet in the hope that the rumor would die a natural death.

But it did not. So, Lucy finally spoke up.


The GMA Network S-Files claimed that it was not true.

[Taken from a Showbiz News Website:]

AFFIRMING LUCY’S GOOD NAME. Rustan’s Department Store, responding to a query made by the GMA-7’s S-Files, issued this official statement made by its own president Bienvenido Tantoco Jr.

“It has come to our attention that there are rumors circulating that Mrs. Lucy Torres-Gomez was caught shoplifting in Rustan’s. We would like the public to know that there is no truth to this and that Mrs. Lucy Torres-Gomez is a customer of good standing and is welcome in any of our establishments at anytime.”

Saddened by how it easy it is for anyone to make up a story and mask it as truth, Lucy accepted the fact that, being married to Richard Gomez, something like this was bound to happen. She said, “I guess nothing just really prepares you for it when it really happens already. At the back of my mind it has always been there.”

She just has to prepare herself for more of something like this in the future, Lucy said. But she resolved that next time she will not be passive anymore. She will meet the insults squarely.

SOURCE: February 2005 issue, YES! magazine


Sources:
http://www.pep.ph/spotlight/fact-or-fiction/16140/lucy-torres-gomez-shoplifting-incident (Karen Pagsolingan - Wednesday, June 04, 2008 @ 04:44PM)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kleptomania

You may also visit:


The Robinson Snake
Pedro Flores
Warlito Toledo
The Legend of Nora Aunor

Saturday, December 15, 2012

San Juan, La Union Ghosts

[This past few days, I've been very busy with too many things, including my studies. That's why I can't search any other exciting and interesting urban legends in the Philippines, and post them here. Well, now I'm back. It's Christmas vacation. Perhaps, I will have a lot of time on focusing my favorite pastime.]


This urban legend have been famous for decades. Maybe some of you knew this one.

The town of San Juan, in the province of La Union, west of Luzon, is a fishing before the coming of Americans. It has a number of ghost legends, including a headless nun, smoking faceless man and a mysterious smiling white lady at the old tower. Most tales are said to have originated around this time and handed down to generations. It’s still a quiet town, but pompous cottages and mansions have popped along its shores.

Here's the ghost legends in the said province:

It was said that the nun was killed and beheaded by the Japanese in the old Hispanic convent, and her convent burned down. Till now the convent is still standing. If someone passes the ruins of the covenant on a full moon at midnight, an eerie bell tolls, signalling the approach of the nun from behind. First, you will feel a cool, creepy breeze. Then wavy long hair brushing against the nape. Looking behind, the victim would discover the spooky tale for himself.

Until the present day, the nun is still haunting the old ruins. No one knows why she's still there, but perhaps she wants to avenge her death.

The white lady is said to appear at midnight in the ruins of an old watch tower that dates to pre-Hispanic times, and is particularly likely to be seen by handsome young men.

It was peculiar, "a ghost who only appears on handsome brave youths". I wanted to laugh at it. Well, for those bored individual young man there, if you wanted to know if you're handsome, the only place you can go and find the answer out is in the Bell Tower in La Union. If she will appear, then you're definitely handsome. However, if you'll tell anybody about her appearance on you, no one will likely to believe. I wonder why she laughs????

Another myth is about the smoking faceless man.

Before the war, (perhaps the WWII) youths were used to smoke cigars in an abandoned man-hole at midnight. Once, a stranger came, face overshadowed by a straw hat, asking for light. When they lent a lit cigar, the man looked up to light his, showing a spine-chilling blank where a face should have been. The faceless man allegedly still shows up, though rarely, because he prefers unbranded, native tobacco to imported ones. Who could be that faceless pal???

[Taken from a Website:]

In 1582, San Juan was proclaimed a mission station under the authority of the Augustian Order, as recorded by the Nueva Segovia Bi-centennial souvenir booklet dated April 25, 1587. By 1586 the town had become the center of the parish, and was renamed San Juan by the Augustian Fathers after the Catholic Patron Saint of San Juan Bautista. The town boasted an Augustinian convent and a population of 6,000. Its first priest was Friar Agustin NiƱo. The center of the parish was subsequently transferred to Bauang, with San Juan sometimes being an out-station (visita) of Bauang and sometimes of Bacnotan. In 1707 the Church of St. John the Baptist was constructed at San Juan. In 1772, the mission station was placed under the authority of the Dominican Order. In 1807, San Juan was established as a parish in its own right.

Pindangan Ruins this is the home of the headless stabbed priest whose sole ghost prowls at night, either carrying his severed head or searching for his head. Some report hearing his head calling out for his body to find it. Many say EVP's happen here all the time and the wind is known to whisper strange malediction to those that disrespect the location.

Pasatsat is word rooted on the Pangasinense word satsat, meaning "to stab". Pasatsats are ghosts of people who died or were killed in the Second World War. Coffins during the time were so expensive, so the families of the dead wrapped the corpses in reed mats or icamen. The dead were buried in places other than cemeteries because tomb robberies were rampant during that era of extreme poverty. These ghosts usually show up in solitary paths and block passersby. To get rid of such a ghost, one needs to stab (hence pasatsat) the reed mat and unravel it, but doing so will show no presence of a corpse, although the mat will emit a noxious odor, much like that of putrid flesh.

In 1898 during the latter days of the Philippine Revolution, the whole of San Juan was razed to the ground by a great fire. Many ghost from this period are said to roam the streets.

The town of San Juan, La Union has a considerable amount of ghost encounters, sightings and many many paranormal monsters and legends, including a headless nun and a smiling white lady at the old tower.

Another strange ghost is that of Devil Cigar Man or as many call him just the Devilman. In the months just before the war, young men from the town would all go around an abandoned man-hole, there they would smoke cigars and speak of the goings on of the day then one night at midnight something strange occurred. Once, a stranger came appearing strangely with his his long well combed black slicked and straight and braided beard is his most striking feature for his face is always overshadowed by a large brimmed straw hat, he came to them asking for light. When they lent a lit cigar, the man looked up to light his, showing a spine-chilling blank where a face should have been. The faceless Devil man allegedly still shows up, because he prefers unbranded, native tobacco to imported ones. And if you don't give him a light he will drag you straight to hell are strike you deaf and dumb on the spot.

Another strange haunted tale is about finding the the Devilman's large brimmed straw hat. If by chance you see a straw hat of or hat of any type of hat or head gear on the side of the road by no means touch it. Because if you dare to do os of God forbid to put it on your head. To do so will bring you straight to hell.

The tale of the strange ghost nun that was beheaded by the Japanese, and her convent burned down is a very weird ghost story.

If someone passes the ruins of the covenant on a full moon at midnight, an eerie ghost bell tolls this is the signaling of the approach of the nun's ghost. One of the many tales tells that the old historical ruins of a Spanish convent were burned by the Japanese and a pious chaste nun was beheaded as an example for all to see.

The old ruins of the covenant still stand. On some nights when an unfortunate person happens to pass by on a full moon at midnight, some spectral bell would toll from the netherworld. It supposedly signals the approach of the ghost nun who will slowly creep up on you from behind. They say she is looking for the man who killed her or his descendents to take her exacting revenge. Many say several daring people have died from fright others driven mad when being touched by her on the left shoulder.

The white lady another ghosts not to be confused with the ghost nun or the Balete Drive specter, is said to appear at midnight in the ruins of an old watch tower that dates to pre-Hispanic times, and is particularly likely to be seen by many individuals. In recent times, she is often called the laughing white lady is said to have been showing herself periodically in the old historical ruins. The ghosts of this woman is said to appear often and her disguised appearance is said to be very frightening for she has no eyes. Only gaping sockets which glow with an erie spooky ghost light. Many report they hear her maniacal ghostly laughter and would rather run the see her eyeless ghosts.

One of the hitchhiker stories tells of three boys who pick up a girl near a cemetery and take her to a party. this is very similar to the tales of Resurrection Mary in Chicago USA. On the way back, the girl complains of the cold and borrows a jacket. The girl disappears near the cemetery, and the boys find the jacket neatly folded on the headstone of her grave. Or that of a freshly dug up grave where the body has been pulled from the earth and partially eaten. Many believe her to be a real ghoul like creature. A ghoul is a folkloric monster associated with graveyards and consuming human flesh, often classified as undead.

In another story, a male hitchhiker asks to be taken to a given address. When they arrive, the hitchhiker has disappeared, but it turns out that he used to live at that address and this is the anniversary of her death. Stories tell that this young disfigured man appears as if he was just in some terrible accident with blood on his clothes.
Sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Juan,_La_Union
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghosts_in_Filipino_culture
http://www.philippinesinsider.com/myths-folklore-superstition/ghost-myths-of-san-juan-la-union/
http://www.hauntedamericatours.com/ghosthunting/phillipines.php